Mapping Mark Walters: Ice Bucket Challenge

It was only a matter of time before someone called me out for the ALS ice bucket challenge. As it turned out, I was challenged by more than one person, however they were both named Tim. In case you’re wondering, I donated $20 — $10 for each challenge.

Can you guess where I was doused with cold water in this week’s video installment?

In quite possibly the most obvious Mapping Mark Walters, I was at The Evening Sun’s 135 Baltimore St. location in downtown Hanover. The building was recently sold to New Hope Ministries, which will convert the 18,000-square-foot facility into a food pantry and its new headquarters.

Related:

Blog: Hanover-area residents chime in on Ice Bucket Challenge

Locals honor Paul Trask with ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

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Women’s club creates garden of peace

By Lauren Linhard – llinhard@eveningsun.com – @LinhardReports

While all you fabulous guys are strapping on those sparkling heels and hoping not to tip over at the Walk a Mile in Her Shoes event, make sure to shuffle on over to the Warheim-Myers Mansion for a special pre-walk celebration.

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Members of Hanover’s Soroptomist International chapter work on the new peace garden on June 27.

The Hanover chapter of Soroptomist International, a service organization focused on women’s rights, is dedicating a peace garden, which the group planted around the mansion’s gazebo.

The garden is meant to bring a local awareness to issues of violence against women and children, said club member Georgia Simpson.

The garden will be a physical reminder for people to get involved in local preventative programs and organizations, she said.

Hanover Mayor Ben Adams will be present at the Aug. 15 event to read a proclamation in honor of the garden at 5:45 p.m.

 

 

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Hanover ‘Dead Files’ episode airs on Saturday

By Lauren Linhard – llinhard@eveningsun.com – @LinhardReports

Everyone knows the saying about respecting history because it shapes the future. Well, sometimes, it’s possible that history might also get stuck in the future in the form of ghosts or spirits or unexplained totally freaky experiences.

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The reported haunted house on Maple Avenue. Submitted photo from Deanna Simpson

Now, whether or not you believe in what goes bump in the night, it’s hard to resist a good ghost story. It’s even harder to turn a deaf ear when it involves a haunted house right in your own town.

So, for those of you who love tales of the spooky and supernatural, get excited for Hanover’s episode of “Dead Files” airing at 10 p.m. this Saturday.

Titled “Assaulted – Hanover, Pa,” the episode investigates the Maple Avenue home of Deanna and Tom Simpson. The 30-minute feature involves an in-depth investigation as well as a spiritual walk through of the property, revealing a number of tragic deaths and five violent spirits.

Not quite convinced this viewing party is for you? Maybe Deanna Simpson’s story of life in a haunted house will pique your interest:

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A photo from inside the house, capturing the image of a floating face. Submitted by Deanna Simpson.

It began with terrifying dreams, Deanna said, of two men standing over her, then one night she opened her eyes and they were standing right next to the bed. Since then, not a single day has gone by where Tom and Deanna haven’t experienced a ghostly encounter.

“It’s beyond anyone’s belief, it’s horrible,” Deanna said. “It started with small things like the sound of footsteps, doors closing on their own and crying or sobbing coming from empty rooms. I was desperate to calm the house down and kept asking God to heal this home.”

Even with the help of a local preacher, a reiki master and paranormal investigators, things only continued to get worse. Footprints have been burnt into the hardwood floor and the Simpsons have woken up with scratches and bruises.

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A ghostly footprint burnt into the floor. Photos submitted by Deanna Simpson.

Possibly most terrifying of all was the time Deanna was washing her face and looked into the mirror, only to see the reflection of a dead child lying on the ground.

“She had sandy blond hair, really curly, and dark eyes and lips,” Deanna said. “And there was blood all over her and the front of the dress.”

Not sure what to do, Tom and Deanna turned to Amy Allan and Steve DiSchiavi of the Travel Channel’s “Dead Files.”

Related

‘Dead Files’ investigates haunted Hanover home

Episode photo gallery

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A history of amusement

By Lauren Linhard – llinhard@eveningsun.com – @LinhardReports

It’s funny when you think about how things have changed when it comes to gaming history. It wasn’t too long ago parents were pulling kids home for dinner from the arcades. And now the issue is getting the kids to go outside the house instead of playing video games.

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Evening Sun file photo by Shane Dunlap

Either way, gaming has been an integral part of American history since the first coin-operated pinball machine was invented in the 1930s. The real heyday for arcade games didn’t hit until the late 1970s, however, according to a 1982 article from Time magazine, when the most popular machines were making $400 in quarters per week.

It was around that same time, in 1969, when Hanover Borough’s amusement tax was first adopted, according to the borough code. Most recently amended in 1981, the ordinance states a $50 tax will be levied on each coin-operated amusement device in the borough.

To put that into perspective, for a place like Timeline Arcade, which opened on Carlisle Street last year with more than 100 arcade games, the full cost of the amusement tax would be $5,400.

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Evening Sun file photo by Shane Dunlap

Now, this isn’t a debate about whether Timeline Arcade should have to pay the tax or not, which the finance committee is currently discussing, or whether or not the ordinance is outdated. It was last amended more than 30 years ago.

But I am curious as to what readers think about an amusement tax in general, keeping in mind this isn’t just a Hanover thing. Cities, boroughs and townships across the U.S. impose amusement taxes. In general though, I’m wondering if they should be.

Sam Miller, Hanover’s financial director, said the borough only made about $1,400 last year off the amusement tax. In the big budget scheme of things, that’s pretty much pocket change.

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Evening Sun file photo by Shane Dunlap

Meanwhile, stores that do feature arcade games are only making an average of $25 a week per game, said Brandon Spencer, owner of Timeline Arcade. So, more and more business owners are taking the games out of their lobbies and selling them to places like Timeline.

So is it really fair for a local government to cut someone’s profits by almost 4 percent per machine (based on earning $1,300 per machine per year)? I’m not sure, but I know it’s a sticky situation, and one that is totally different for, say, Hanover versus Las Vegas.

What do you think?

Related

Hanover, Timeline Arcade debate amusement tax

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Mapping Mark Walters: Crossing the border

Years ago, area downtowns were vibrant places to be.

On what town square am I standing?

On what town square am I standing?

Urban areas hosted restaurants, shops, and attractive commercial and residential real estate.

In the 1980s and into the ’90s, middle America suburbanized, pulling investors away from downtown and into surrounding areas.

Hotels and restaurants were built near large shopping centers, contributing to the draw away from town squares. Houses were built on land previously used for agricultural purposes.

And while development expanded in what we now call the suburbs, it died on Main Streets across America, turning some boroughs and cities into dilapidated shells of their former selves.

What town square am I standing on in this week’s selfie?

Update, June 29

Center Square in downtown Hanover is the confluence of three Pennsylvania interstates.

Related stories:

New wave of business

June 27 shooting

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‘Closed Door’ opens future for young directors

By Lauren Linhard – llinhard@eveningsun.com – @LinhardReports

Every once in a while you get the chance to witness young genius – it’s one of those rare moments when you look at someone and think, “Wow, you’re really going places.” 1536549_1476993579193622_2099154621_n

That happened to me last night while attending the dress rehearsal for “Closed Door,” a completely original musical written by two recent high school graduates. I can’t image, at the age of 18 and 19, being able to sit down and crank out an entire production, complete with Broadway style musical numbers and a full script.

But, Zachary Terrazas and Drew Becker, both of Hanover, did it, and they did it well.

The Friendship

Zach and Drew met about 10 years ago as young actors through Hanover community theater productions. At 17 years old,  Zach wrote “The Victim,” his first musical, and Drew was part of the cast. As Zach began to look for his next project last year, he turned to Drew as a possible partner.

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Photo by Shane Dunlap

The Collaboration

Zach and Drew approached the project with a “Why not?” attitude, they said, taking it upon themselves to provide another outlet for community theater - a resource they had noticed was in short supply over the summer months.

Drew took on the script while Zach wrote the music. A number of rewrites were necessary, Zach said, until they found a flow that worked for both of them.

The Idea

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Photo by Sonya Paclob

The two directors started by discussing social issues they thought could be communicated well through a theater medium. They agreed to develop a musical around the topic of homosexuality, inspired by Drew’s recent coming out to friends and family.

The goal is not to push any specific belief down the audience’s throat, Drew said, but to make them think.

Based in 1866, the play takes place in a time when America was already broken and unstable, Zach said. The story revolves around a young man named Ryker, played by Drew, who realizes he’s gay, and what that means to friends, family and society as a whole during that time.

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Photo by Shane Dunlap

The Process

It began with research. Most of the information was found in historic newspapers, Zach said, with reports of murder involving a homosexual or headlines alerting people a “spawn of Satan” was living in the town.

They decided to set the play in Ohio after reading a particularly gruesome article about a town in Ohio hanging a homosexual. From there, Zach and Drew mapped out the characters and a general plot.

It took six months to write the script and the music, and rehearsals began in December.

The Obstacles

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Photo by Shane Dunlap

The hardest part was the technical and management side of the production, Drew said. Each and every day was filled with a new challenge, whether it was running to the store in the middle of rehearsal to buy lighting cord or losing cast members four months into the project.

Funding was another thing they weren’t prepared for, but quickly became a topic of importance after pricing a $1,000 lighting system. To take care of those unexpected, but clearly necessary expenses, the “Closed Door” cast put on two cabaret performances at $5 a ticket.

The Result

“Closed Door” is not a pretty production; it’s not “Mary Poppins,” Zach said. It deals with a difficult topic in a difficult time, and it should affect every member of the audience on some level, he said.

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Photo by Shane Dunlap

Though they are unsure of what response the play will elicit, Drew said, they know there will be one, and they welcome whatever discussion it may create.

Performances are at 7:30 p.m., June 27-29 at 47 W. Philadelphia St., York. Tickets are available at the door.

Musical sneak peak videos: Through the Years We Go; What is This; The Marriage Song

Related

Hanover directors produce original play about homosexuality

Photo gallery from “Closed Door” rehearsal

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More on the Hanover Revitalization

Alex Slagle, left, owner of The Hanover Hub, and Brent Stambaugh, co-owner of Miscreation Brewing Company, talk inside the new property leased for Miscreation Brewing Company at the corner of Carlise Street and Route 116 in downtown Hanover. (Shane Dunlap - The Evening Sun)

Alex Slagle, left, owner of The Hanover Hub, and Brent Stambaugh, co-owner of Miscreation Brewing Company, talk inside the new property leased for Miscreation Brewing Company at the corner of Carlise Street and Route 116 in downtown Hanover. (Shane Dunlap – The Evening Sun)

Earlier this week, I had the pleasure of speaking with the owners of Miscreation Brewing, Something Wicked Brewing, Aldus Brewing and the new owners of the Hanover Hub as they met to celebrate Miscreation’s move into the square. As is the case with many stories, not everything made it into print; there were simply too many topics to fit. So here are some additional tidbits to go along with the story, Revitalizing Hanover: New wave of businesses owners celebrate progress. And be sure to follow along with The Evening Sun as we continue to cover the new era of downtown business owners.

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For the love of beer

By Lauren Linhard – llinhard@eveningsun.com – @LinhardReports

There’s no doubt about it – the craft beer industry is on the move in Hanover. Warehouse Gourmet cleared the path a few years back and now Something Wicked Brewing and Miscreation Brewery are setting up shop in downtown.

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Photo by Shane Dunlap

Can you imagine? This time next year, downtown could be full of small-town foodie lovers enjoying locally-crafted beers created by local people at local establishments. The nightlife puzzle that seems to have eluded Hanover is coming together.

In the meantime, because I am super excited to get my taste on at these places, I asked the six brewers of Something Wicked to share their favorite craft beers (not counting their own creations).

What do you think of the list?

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Photo by Shane Dunlap

Bill:
Lagunitas Sucks IPA
Nugget Nectar Troegs
Enjoy by series Stone Brewing
Dogfish 75 minute IPA

Bridget:
Braaaiins pumpkin ale by spring house.
Ovila abbey saison with mandarin orange and peppercorn.
Voodoo love child.
Ayinger brau-weisse.

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The results of a weekend brew at Something Wicked Brewing

Scott:
Green flash “west coast ipa”
Three Floyd’s “zombie dust ”
Brooklyn’s “black chocolate stout”
Fegley’s brew works “hop’solutely”

Cindy:
Dogfish 75 minute
Otter Creek Fresh Slice
Sierra Nevada Celebration
Miller Lite

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Photo by Shane Dunlap

Jim:
Konig Ludwig Weissbier
Franziskaner Hefe-Weissbier
Appalachian Brewing Company Scottish Ale

Steve:
Loose Cannon – Heavy Seas Brewing
Sweet Baby Jesus – DuClaw Brewing
Troegs Hop Back – Troegs Brewing
Guinness

Related

Behind the scenes of Something Wicked Brewing

Miscreation Brewery

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Friday the 13th – an unlucky history

By Lauren Linhard – llinhard@eveningsun.com – @LinhardReports

Fun (or maybe not so fun) fact: June 13th, this Friday, is the only Friday the 13th of the entire year.

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I’m watching you….

So it’s possible this is going to be the most unlucky Friday of 2014, compared to other years when the curse of 13 is spread out a little more. Or maybe, absolutely nothing will happen and this whole thing is a bunch of hocus pocus.

Either way, it can’t be denied that a certain stigma, created by Hollywood or history, is attached to any Friday that happens to fall on the 13th.

According to a poll The Evening Sun conducted in 2008, 5.6 percent of people consider the day especially unlucky and would rather stay in bed than brave the outside world. A group of 13.8 percent admitted they’ll be a little more aware of black cats, broken mirrors and walking under ladders that day. And an overwhelming 80 percent think the whole thing is a sham and will most likely be celebrating the unofficial spooky holiday with a horror movie marathon (count me out).

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Someone’s in trouble.

Check out some of the possible roots of Friday the 13th:

Norse Mythology: A group of gods were having a dinner party in the heaven of Valhalla. In walked the uninvited 13th guest, the mischievous trickster god Loki. Once there, he arranged for the god of darkness to shoot the god of joy and gladness.

Biblical: Judas, the apostle who betrayed Jesus, was the 13th person to arrive at the Last Supper. It is also believed that Abel was slain by Cain on a Friday the 13th.

Numerology: Twelve is considered  a “complete” number, while 13, because it exceeds 12 by one, is “irregular” which makes it restless. There are 12 months in a year, 12 signs of the zodiac, 12 gods of Olympus, 12 labors of Hercules, 12 tribes of Israel and 12 apostles of Jesus. Never 13.

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On the horizon for Main Street Hanover

By Lauren Linhard – llinhard@eveningsun.com – @LinhardReports

There are some really exciting changes and improvements coming Hanover’s way thanks to the relatively new Main Street Hanover program. Most of its projects have been behind the scenes, laying the ground work for future awesomeness, but its becoming a much more common name around town lately.

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Main Street Hanover Keystone designation celebration in downtown.

Check out what Main Street Hanover has in store over the next few months!

1) Second Saturdays - Each month merchants work together to cross promote specials, discounts, and featured items according to that monthly theme.  June’s theme is Strawberry Saturday.

2) Business Guide – Main Street Hanover’s Economic Restructuring Committee has created a comprehensive business guide for entrepreneurs who want to open a business in the downtown, and serves as a resource for current business owners interested in expansion.

3) New Website – Main Street Hanover’s Promotions Committee is working on a website, with plans to launch in July. It will serve as a “one-stop-shop” for all things downtown, and will feature downtown locations to shop and dine.

1899915_227361607452116_116299024_n4) E-News – With the launch of the website, the E-Newsletter will be distributed monthly for up-to-date downtown activities.  It will feature the Second Saturdays program, events, beautification, business biographies and committee updates.

5) Public Art Program – Main Street Hanover’s Design Committee is currently working on the first installation of Public Art for the downtown.  Local artists have developed concepts approved by the committee and will execute the projects in upcoming months.

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